The Inability to be at Home in the World: Religion, Salvation and Value Pluralism

It is rare for a human being to be completely at home in the world. No matter how well things go for us we have a sense that our lives are missing something important. As we move about our lives we may have moments of exquisite joy, and we may feel that our lives are going extraordinarily well, and yet it always seems, for me at least, like my life is incomplete as it misses out on some valuable good. In this entry I would like to point out that while traditional religions like Christianity are very good at explaining this incapability of humans to be at home in the world, the Berlinian philosophy of value pluralism is also adept at explaining it. In a sense, this entry is meant to be a response to theorists like Peter Lawler who contrast the attempt to make humans at home in the world through technological and social progress with traditional religion’s acceptance of this anxiety as a necessary part of our worldly condition. For theorists in this tradition of thought the fact that we have not gotten rid of human anxiety and made human beings entirely at home in the world is a testament to the truth of traditional religion, and Christian faith in particular. While this contrast discloses an element of reality, by not making mention of non-religious philosophies that can make room for the human incapability to be at home in the world, it leaves out something very important.

Many traditional religions are adept at explaining our inability to be at home and our perennial sense that there is something more, but for the sake of this entry I will examine Christianity in particular. At its most basic thinkers like Lawler point out that society or nature is not our natural home, and in these places we are still estranged from God no matter how idyllic the environment we inhabit is. We are creatures who have fallen from grace and while we may be able to get closer to God through faith and religious practise, our anxieties will not be abolished as long as we are estranged from him, and we will remain at least somewhat estranged during this life. This explanation is powerful, and while I am not a Christian I cannot help but find it beautiful in a certain way.

On the other hand, we might explain our inability to be at home in the world by looking to the nature of value. According to Berlin, and his many followers, values are incommensurable or incompatible in some basic sense. Thus, while it may be true that life of a monk and the life devoted to artistic creativity are both valuable, these values cannot be simply evaluated according to simple criteria, and further these goods may not be able to be woven into the life of person or the life of a community.

For example, if I commit myself to the pursuit of artistic creativity this necessarily means that I will not be able to fully develop other goods in my life like familial affection, or the life of quiet reflection, as goods must be developed and commitment to one good tends to exclude others. That said, there is no reason to commit to one single good, but even for those of us who try to combine many goods into a single life, there is a limit to which goods can be combined into a single life. For example, I may appreciate the generosity and courage exemplified in the life of the aristocrat who takes care to make sure that his subjects are protected and well cared for, but I could not combine these goods with a life that affirms the legal and political equality of human beings. I cannot be an excellent aristocrat while being an excellent jobholder in a liberal democratic society.

From this understanding of value we might say that the reason why we are unable to feel completely at home in the world in our lives is because our lives always lack a significant array of goods that we recognize as valuable despite their incompatibility with the goods we have built our lives around. These goods that we lack call to us and tell us that there is something more, but yet they cannot be coherently brought into our lives without destroying other goods that we hold dear. So we are never to be completely satisfied or at home with the lives we build as they always remain the cobbling together of many valuable things, but at the expense of others that we never stop longing for. This longing is what underlies our lack of ability to be at home in the world. Consequently, an affirmation of value pluralism can serve as another basis for explaining our perennial anxiety and sense that there is more, and thus traditional religion does not have the monopoly on being able to explain the human inability to be at home in the world. Therefore, the contrast is not simply between technological and social progress directed towards eliminating all anxiety and traditional religion.

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3 thoughts on “The Inability to be at Home in the World: Religion, Salvation and Value Pluralism

    • Yes, that is pretty close to what I am saying. Although I think it goes further than internal conflict. Many goods are not simply experienced by a neutral subject apart from them. Rather the goods change the nature of the subject wrapped up with them, and as we become wrapped up with certain goods, the possibility of experiencing and being wrapped up with other goods is excluded. For example, developing certain capabilities like rational . When we engage in certain kinds of practises we develop certain capabilities and qualities, and as a result we become beings who are constituted by those qualities and thus are closed off from maintaining those capabilities and qualities while pursuing others that we may be equally drawn to as pursuing those other qualities will mean moving away from the practise of the original qualities.

      For example, in my case I have developed a form of indifference to the course of events which allows me to cope with ordinarily upsetting occurrences, But I think this has hampered my ability to be upset and to feel indignant when I hear about an awful injustice. When a terrible injustice happens in the world I recognize how awful they are, but it does not really hit me which I see as a flaw in my way of responding to the world; however, this flaw is rooted in my ability to deal with the fact that life often includes terrible events. Which is a positive and desirable quality.

      • I think I see what you mean. Well, it’s an interesting explanation of not feeling at home in the world. I wonder if what you’re describing brings upon a feeling of alienation from others, to be closed off to a certain kind of thinking. And if this is the case, that social alienation (which is not something unique to certain personalities necessarily, but in all of us) is a kind of “not feeling at home” on a different level—perhaps a more ordinary and less cosmic one?

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